Land o’Glebe: Feeding of the 5000 (plus)

imageSusanne has been busy in the kitchen.

Last Sunday in the warmer afternoon, she arrived in full garb, with fondant cakes in her basket. We lifted a corner of G2 roof and hood and swiftly inserted the food… The hive was very quiet, no bees to be seen in the super, only some, comatose on the excluder… Now onto G1, same approach trying to be as quick as possible. But a completely different situation greeted us: now, the bees literally swarmed up. To add to our panic we realized the fondant slab was too high to fit under the crown board?  We were not prepared for that: no eke to hand…what do we do? we took the crown boad away, and putting the roof back on, hoped for the best…

 

Land o’Glebe winterisation

cosies!Now the bees will be very well protected with cosies of black tar paper and chicken wire all round the hives plus mouseguards across the entrance… Wood peckers and  mice will not be happy.

 

Land o’Glebe, what’s going on in there?

A Steep Learning Curve

A Steep Learning Curve

Too quiet a hive? …Thursday 19th November 2015: We’ve been  all a-tremble at Land o’Glebe. Peter  pointed out early this morning that he observed no movement at G2, despite his mowing close to the hive on his tractor and creating the usual havoc in the garden. Yet this colony has been quite hyperactive, to say the least, in the past months. What is going on inside? I  went and looked at the entrance: nothing, no movement, not even the eyes of the guards usually shining though the dark confines of the entrance slot as they monitor all comers… I put my ear to the brood box, no humming or fanning noise. I am worried, Is this what they call Colony Collapse Disorder? But why? …I go back to the house, read reams- I mean tomes- on the subject, I am too anxious.  I have to find out somehow. Anyway, I shall lift the roof later in the afternoon when the sun brings up the  temperature, at the time of their regular feed of syrup… Reader, you will not be surprised to learn that all is well and they are swarming up as usual to the top of the brood frames, no doubt expecting their regular treat. Phew!

Land o’Glebe “All Quiet on the Northern Front”…?

A Steep Learning Curve

A Steep Learning Curve

Sunday 22nd November, the snow has arrived, only a dusting(?) says Peter. But it looks cold out there and I wonder how the boys are doing.  So, in my jimjams, furry housecoat and wellies I make my way to the hives. At the G2, by the entrance, no activity whatsoever again. Hmmm…. Let’s have a look at G1 entrance.. Lo and behold, some foragers are going out, but I am quite non-plussed by the number of dead bodies on the landing strip, one or two on their back with still moving legs. Peter goes out and counts 15 cadavers. He is going to take a picture, but let me first change into my day clothes!